Palliative Care: Unique Coordination Challenges

Providing high-quality palliative care demands a lot from health practitioners. While it’s true that care should always be patient-centred, these words take on greater significance during the final stage of life. For health care providers, sensitivity and compassion are key. Palliative patients often have unique pain-related issues, as well as pressing psychological and spiritual needs.

Getting Care Teams on Board with Communication Technology

If you’re involved in coordinating the care of complex patients, you know the value of communication. It’s something we talk about a lot on this blog, and for good reason. Today, technology makes communication easier than ever before. The click of a key or the tap of a screen can connect two people across the

Bridging the Transition to Home: Tips for Care Coordinators

According to a 2012 study, one in 12 Canadian patients is readmitted to the hospital within 30 days. Why do so many people who have been discharged wind up back in acute care? In many cases, the answer may be faulty discharge planning and poor communication. Providing adequate care for a single at-home patient can

4 Online Wound Care Resources to Make a Nurse’s Life Easier

If you’re a nurse, you’ve made a commitment to lifelong learning. From the evolution of best practices to new products and treatments, there’s always new information to absorb. This is especially true in rapidly advancing fields—like wound care. Progress in wound care over the last two decades has been remarkable. Today, there are more educational

Care Coordinators: Helping Patients Transition to Community Care

Often, care coordinators come into patients’ lives at a difficult time. By the time your assigned to somebody, she’s probably had a lot of experience with the health care system. And it’s likely that some of it has left her frustrated. During transitions from hospital to home, these emotions can be especially strong. The triage

Measuring Quality for Money in Wound Management

If you work with chronic wounds, you know your skill set is in demand. And due to increasing rates of diseases like diabetes, the need for high-quality wound care is only growing. In home care particularly, there’s never been a greater need for improved wound management processes. Of course, a big part of improving these

The Future of Care Coordinator-Physician Collaboration

If you’re a care coordinator, your value to home care patients is enormous. But how well aware are other health care professionals of the contributions you make? For example, do always you receive the full cooperation of all of the physicians you work with? The truth is, there are often obstacles to getting busy professionals

How Care Coordinators Can Reduce Stress for Family Caregivers

If you’re a care coordinator, you work hard to provide patient-centred care. This critically important concept—patient-centredness—gets a lot of attention, even outside of health care professions. But there’s another concept that care coordinators strive to embody—one that deserves a lot more consideration than it receives. We’re talking about family-centred care. All too often, the family

Why Communication Skills are Critical to Wound Management

Right now, there’s more information than ever before about what it means to practice effective wound management. From therapeutic innovations to advances in our knowledge of wound dressings, professionals in the field have a wealth of new options. That said, one of the most critical factors in high-quality wound care isn’t related to any scientific

Patient Goal Setting: How Should Care Coordinators Help?

It’s no secret that health care in Ontario is becoming more patient-centred. The province’s action plan for health care, Patient’s First, was enacted in 2015. In the time since, a significant shift has occurred. Now more than ever before, people are at the centre of the care they receive. What does that mean? For many,